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Photos by: Jane Beiles
Photos by: Jane Beiles

 

For one couple in rural Connecticut the concept was to create a multigenerational space to enjoy with their five children, friends, and extended family. Part of a sweeping master plan for their property, this understated antiqued party barn is intended to adapt as the family grows and ages over time.

 

Photos by: Jane Beiles
Photos by: Jane Beiles

 

Architect Mark P. Finlay, having a 20-year relationship with the family, defined the core concept for this structure as a multigenerational building with a long-term plan. The current incarnation of the space is that of a party barn where the owners children can spend time with their friends out of the main house while remaining on the family property.

 

Photos by: Jane Beiles
Photos by: Jane Beiles

 

“It’s a multigenerational design.” Explains Mark. “We worked it through and talked about the functions of the building, how it’s going to work, who is going to use it, how it would be used in 20 years versus now. We really talked through the whole thing. It’s part of a three generation, or 50-year, plan. It is a building with a singular design idea that will work really well in the future because it can adapt to a lot of different functions.”

 

Legacy Home

 

Perched high on a cliffside in rural Maine between nesting sites for Bald Eagles, this vacation home melds the traditional with the modern for a truly timeless design. Integrating steel, stone and heavy timbers, this project takes its inspiration from large vacation estates common in the early 1940’s and brings it into the 21st century.

 

Legacy Home

 

“The property is a classic Maine coastline property with all the character of local fishermen and rough and tumble loggers. It is just beautiful country, and depending on where you are coming from, probably inexpensive to visit.” Explained Chip Thorner, builder on the project.

 

Legacy Home

 

Working on an idyllic granite cliffside with stunning views is not without its difficulties. The building process had to contend with the rocky terrain, logistical hurdles, and local wildlife regulations.

 

Legacy Home

 

Timber Frame Home in Ithaca NY by New Energy Works

 

I’ve seen my fair share of idyllic & passionate raisings. It comes with the job, and similar to the oiled Doug fir smell that hits you when you enter our New York office, its wonderment fades over time. Still delightful and one of the reasons I love working here, but less obvious in the day-to-day.

The timbers were significantly more beautiful that I thought they would be once they were being raised. I had the opportunity to come to the New Energy Works Timber frame shop, and I would say that seeing parts of our house being milled was one of my favorite aspects of the project along with meeting the people behind the scenes, it was a very special experience for me personally, I loved it.” —Gwynne

 

Timber Frame Home in Ithaca NY by New Energy Works

 

And I’ll admit that it’s been a while since I’ve put my boots on, left my screen, and headed to site. A white-out drive and -20 degrees on a January morning weren’t exactly what I had in mind, but I had a favorite coworker/copilot (Meg) and a destination of Ithaca—my hands-down #1 Finger Lakes town.

“I think the raising happened on the coldest day of the year; it was a major feat. I cannot believe the crew withstood that cold. I think I had adrenalin pumping because I was so excited, literally running in circles with giddiness, it was a spectacular experience. I almost wish the raising could have been in snow motion, it was sort of like Christmas, you wait, and you wait, and you are so excited, I really just wanted to slow it down once it started to make it last longer.